DerekLeBlanc
 LeBlanc asks one of the children attending a Kids S.A.F.E. presentation to provide one of the steps to follow if they were to ever find a gun without an adult around. As a staunch supporter of the right to own and carry firearms provided by the second amendment, LeBlanc hopes to motivate others to carry guns more often, but also recognizes the potential risks created by such a change. "I want everyone to be armed, but I also don't want any family to experience a tragedy," he said. (Aaron Nelson)
 LeBlanc carries a concealed firearm on his person most of the time. His passion for self-defense originated after an altercation in his home, which ended when a previous girlfriend theatened an intruder with a shotgun until authorities could arrive.  "I plan my vacations around where I can carry my gun now," he says. Though he hopes to never have to use his gun in any kind of violent encounter moving forward, he believes in his right to protect himself, and says that "seeing a barrel or hearing a gun's slide is often all it takes." (Aaron Nelson)
 Derek LeBlanc aims an AR-15 rifle in the home of part-time, class three firearms dealer Erik Peale in Veneta, Ore., on Jan. 29, 2017. LeBlanc has many friends who help provide him with guns for raffles and presentations through his organizations. (Aaron Nelson)
 LeBlanc's girlfriend, Jen Ebert, laughs and pokes at a zit on his nose as they wait for Ebert's daughter Payton to get ready before leaving for an evening workout at Eugene Crossfit. "Guns were never that important to me before I met Derek," Ebert said. "But now I understand how important teaching safe practices really is. I want my daughter to be safe as she can be, even when I'm not around." (Aaron Nelson)
 LeBlanc trains at Eugene Crossfit with his girlfriend, Jen Ebert, multiple times a week as a means of spending quality time, and a chance to prepare for the Lane County Sheriff Department's physical assessment test, known as the ORPAT. He believes a job with the Sheriff's Department would be "another way to reach the community. People tend to listen when a badge is involved," he said. (Aaron Nelson)
 LeBlanc carries a tattoo on his shoulder of a Knight's helmet placed over an American flag. (Aaron Nelson)
 With courses and events across Lane County, LeBlanc keeps all of the firearms and gear he may need carefully packed inside a small white trailer he likes to call his mobile office. (Aaron Nelson)
 Derek has a wide variety of firearms, all of which are assets of Lethal Lovebirds, LLC. The guns are kept unloaded in lockable cases inside the trailer he uses to haul his gear between classes and event locations. (Aaron Nelson)
 Derek LeBlanc reacts after volunteers and Lethal Lovebirds class participants Krystal Ashley and Diane Slocum reveal they have already sold multiple tickets for his raffle for an AR-15 modern sporting rifle, moments after the three made a bet to sell the most in a week, during a staff meeting on Feb. 2, 2017, prior to the Eugene Boat & Sportsman show. "These women are my rocks," said LeBlanc. "They keep me in this business when things get really tough and I want to quit. " (Aaron Nelson)
 Derek LeBlanc listens to advice from his volunteer staff and girlfriend Jen Ebert after completing his first Kids S.A.F.E. presentation inside a public school on Feb. 3, 2017, in the Elmira High School Auditorium. "Gun education in every school is the goal," said LeBlanc. (Aaron Nelson)
 Karen Wussting speaks with LeBlanc about techniques for dealing with a misfiring gun during a Lethal Lovebirds women's self defense course at the Albany Pistol & Rifle Club in Albany, Ore., on Feb. 11, 2017. "I want to get as many of these women as possible to feel comfortable carrying a firearm in their daily lives. It takes confidence, and confidence only comes with time and practice," said LeBlanc. (Aaron Nelson)
 Karen Wussting fires down range during one of LeBlanc's women's self-defense classes at the Albany Rifle and Pistol Club on Feb. 11, 2017. Though she has held her concealed carry permit in Oregon for multiple years, she has never actively carried firearms. "I'm hoping to build my confidence with the gun so that I will feel more comfortable keeping it on me more often," Wussting said. (Aaron Nelson)
prev / next